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2009 Tenure and Promotion

Tenure and Promotion to Associate Professor

Fern M. Delamere

Department of Applied Human Sciences

Fern M. Delamere was hired as Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied Human Sciences in 2004. Prior to completing her PhD at the University of Waterloo, Dr. Delamere worked for two years as a full-time Lecturer at Dalhousie University. Dr. Delameres research is focused on media technology, culture, and virtual worlds. More specifically, her research explores online leisure contexts and the digitally mediated social networks of marginalized social groups related to disability and gender. Dr. Delamere has published extensively. Her publications, like her research, are interdisciplinary. She is well published within her primary field of leisure studies, but has other publications in media communications and in the burgeoning field of game studies. As a co-applicant Dr. Delamere has SSHRC funding involvement associated to the Sport Participation Research Initiative program with Dr. William Harvey (McGill) and Dr. Natalie Grizenko (Douglas Hospital). The study is titled "Children with Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and physical activity behaviour." She has also been awarded Contingency Bridge Funding in relation to her SSRCH grant application titled "Online Computer Games as Contested Space: Female gamers experience of the digital gaming." In addition, Dr. Delamere supported the development of Concordias new Technoculture, Art, and Games Research Center. Her undergraduate teaching is directly linked to her areas of research. Having no graduate program in her departmental area, she is involved with graduate students in other Concordia Departments and has been invited as an External Committee member for McGills School of Social Work a number of times.

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Marie-France Dion

Department of theological Studies

Marie-France Dion received a PhD in Biblical Studies from the Faculté de théologie et des sciences religieuses de l'Université de Montréal (2004). In 2005, she was hired as Assistant Professor in the Department of Theological Studies at Concordia University. Dr. Dion is presently working on two major research projects. The first, funded by the FQRSC, focuses on the concept of divine election (people, land, king, etc.) within the Hebrew Bible. She has published articles and a book on the subject. The second project is funded by SSHRC and pertains to the Dead Sea Scrolls. Dr. Dion works with a team of renowned French Canadian and European scholars who are currently engaged in producing a multivolume critical French edition of the Dead Sea Scrolls. She has been invited to present at congresses, colloquiums, symposiums and conferences on issues pertaining to both her research projects as well as on methodologies in working with ancient Hebrew texts.

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Lorenzo DiTommaso

Department of Theology

Lorenzo DiTommaso was hired as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Theology in 2004. He received his PhD from McMaster University in 2002, and before joining Concordia was a two-year SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at Yale, a Research Fellow at Yale Divinity School, and National Endowment for the Humanities Research Fellow at Saint Louis University. A specialist in apocalypticism (ancient, mediaeval, and modern) and apocryphal literature, with a special interest in the Dead Sea Scrolls, he has written or edited five books (with two more under contract), over sixty articles, book chapters, or encyclopaedia entries, and several dozen reviews. He has been invited to present plenary addresses and conference papers at numerous international colloquia, and has been awarded multiple grants and fellowships from university, national and international agencies and institutions, including two consecutive SSHRC Standard Research Grants (2005-2008, 2008-2011). Among his current projects is a new book, From Antiquity to Armageddon: The Architecture of Apocalypticism, forthcoming from Oxford University Press, which re-examines the way that we understand the apocalyptic worldview and its effects on religion, politics, and culture from antiquity to the contemporary era.

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Mark Ellenbogen

Department of Psychology

Mark Ellenbogen was hired as an Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Developmental Psychopathology in the Department of Psychology in 2004. Prior to joining Concordia, Dr. Ellenbogen completed his postdoctoral studies at the Université de Montréal and a clinical internship at the Centre for Addictions and Mental Health in Toronto. Dr. Ellenbogen earned his PhD (2001) in Psychology from the Concordia, and a Master's degree from McGill University in the Department of Psychiatry. He has published extensively in high ranking journals and is currently engaged in CIHR and SSHRC funded research on understanding the biological and psychosocial antecedents of social dysfunction and depression. Dr. Ellenbogen is interested in how environmental factors such as a stressful family environment influence developing hormonal systems and how these changes may influence psychosocial functioning and increase the risk of maladjustment and the development of mental disorders. To address these issues, Dr. Ellenbogen studies different aspects of individual functioning and development in populations of healthy volunteers, clinically depressed patients, and a unique high risk sample of children from families with a parent having bipolar disorder (also known as manic-depressive illness). In addition, Dr. Ellenbogen's research attempts to identify important cognitive and emotional factors that mediate the relationship between exposure to a stressful environment and later outcome. One objective of this research is to examine whether certain styles of processing information in the environment increase one's vulnerability to stress. Other areas of research include the study of hormones, specific gene polymorphisms, stressful life events, and interpersonal functioning as vulnerability factors for the development of mental disorders. Thus, Dr. Ellenbogen's has established a multidisciplinary and innovative research program since arriving at Concordia.

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Daniela Isac

Department of Classics, Modern Languages and Linguistics

Daniela Isac received her PhD in 2000 from the University of Bucharest where she had taught starting in 1990. Her interests include syntactic theory, the syntax-semantics interface and the philosophical foundations of linguistics as cognitive science. She has published extensively on the syntax of Romance languages. In 2006 she published a paper on the syntactic and semantic nature of the definite determiner. She recently published "I-language: An Introduction to Linguistics as Cognitive Science" (Oxford, 2008) with Concordia colleague Charles Reiss, and she is currently working on a new monograph on the syntax and semantics of various clause types.

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Nora Jaffary

Department of History

Dr. Nora Jaffary was hired as Assistant Professor in the History Department in 2004. Prior to coming to Concordia, Dr. Jaffary held an assistant professorship for three years at the University of Northern Iowa and has also taught at the University of Saskatchewan and in the University of Wisconsin college system. She received her PhD in Latin American History in 2000 from Columbia University. Since joining Concordia, Dr. Jaffary has published a critically-acclaimed monograph titled False Mystics: Deviant Orthodoxy in Colonial Mexico and a number of articles. She edited a collection of essays, Gender, Race, and Religion in the Colonization of the Americas, which was published in 2007. Assisted by a grant from the Fonds Québécois de la recherche sur la société et la culture, she is currently working on a second monograph dealing with women's medical history in Mexico and has nearly completed her collaboration on a textbook of primary sources of Mexican history in translation. She is also involved in two other collaborative research projects at George Mason University's Center for History and the New Media and at Concordia's Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling.

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Laszlo Kalman

Department of Physics

Laszlo Kalman received his PhD (1998) in physics from University of Szeged, Hungary. Prior to joining the Department of Physics in 2005, Dr. Kalman spent, with interruptions, more than five years as a postdoctoral fellow and a Faculty Research Associate in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry of Arizona State University while he was on leave from his permanent appointment as Assistant Professor at the Department of Biophysics at University of Szeged. Dr. Kalman's multidisciplinary research connects concepts stemming from physics, chemistry, and biology. He has published over 20 peer-reviewed research articles in high impact journals such as Nature, Biochemistry, Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, and FEBS Letters. Dr. Kalman's research is currently funded by NSERC (Discovery and RTI) and the CFI. He received multiple awards for both teaching and research from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and the Hungarian Biophysical Society. He is the recipient of the Young Investigator Award from the Gordon Research Conference on Photosynthesis, USA (1999) and the Petro-Canada Young Innovator Award (2006/2007).

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Ming Li

Department of Economics

Ming Li joined the Department of Economics as an Assistant Professor in 2004, after earning his PhD in Economics from University of Wisconsin, Madison. He has published his research in top economics journals including Journal of Economic Theory, International Journal of Game Theory, and Journal of Public Economic Theory. He has frequently presented his work at international conferences and invited university seminars. Dr. Li's main research interests are in the fields of game theory, information economics, and political economy. Dr. Li's research is funded by an FQRSC grant from 2007 to 2010. He has refereed for top general interest and theory journals in economics.

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Denis Liakin

Département d'études françaises

Depuis 2004, Denis Liakin est professeur adjoint à l'Université Concordia au Département d'études Françaises. Il détient un doctorat en études françaises, option linguistique, de l'Université Western Ontario. Les recherches de Dr. Liakin portent sur l'acquisition du langage et la syntaxe générative. Il travaille en tant que chercheur principal sur le projet « Le rôle des catégories fonctionnelles dans l'acquisition du langage » subventionné par le Fonds québécois de la recherche sur la société et la culture. Dans le cadre de son travail de chercheur en milieu industriel chez Nstein Technologies (2001-2004), il a participé à une recherche intensive en linguistique informatique qui produit une nouvelle technologie d'analyse de texte qui combine les forces de l'analyse linguistique, de l'analyse statistique ainsi que de l'intelligence artificielle.

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Warren Linds

Department of Applied Human Sciences

Warren Linds was hired as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied Human Sciences in 2004. Prior to joining Concordia University, Dr. Linds served as a part-time instructor at the University of Regina and the University of British Columbia. Dr. Linds earned his PhD (2002) in Education from the University of British Columbia. Before beginning his graduate studies in 1996, he spent 17 years working in international development education. Dr. Linds also worked for 6 years in community television, radio and newspapers in Vancouver and Newfoundland. He has had extensive experience in popular theatre and community development. This background has been critical to his teaching approach in which he brings practical experiences and theoretical approaches together in undergraduate courses on diversity and small group leadership, and in graduate courses on the ethics and philosophy of intervention. Dr. Linds has researched and published in the areas of group facilitation, anti-oppression and anti-racism pedagogy, the fostering of youth leadership, health decision-making with aboriginal youth, and alternative and arts-based approaches to qualitative research and documentation. He has presented at both national and international conferences in education, critical pedagogy, popular theatre and complexity theory. Trained in a variety of qualitative research methods, he is active as a supervisor and committee members for MA and PhD students.

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Dipjyoti Majumdar

Department of Economics

Dipjyoti Majumdar has joined the Department of Economics as an Assistant Professor in 2004. Prior to joining Concordia, he was a postdoctoral research fellow at Laboratoire d'Econometrie, Ecole Polytechinque, Paris, France and at the Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE), Universite Catholique de Louvain, Belgium. Dr. Majumdar earned his PhD in Economics at Indian Statistical Institute, New Delhi, India in 2003. His main research interests are in the fields of social choice theory and game theory. He has published a number of high-impact papers on mechanism design in some of the most prestigious economic journals, and he has been frequently presenting his work at international conferences and invited university seminars. Dr. Majumdar has received a FQRSC new researchers grant and a standard research grant from SSHRC (both grants for the period 2006-09). He has served as an organizing committee member and program committee co-chair for the Ninth Meeting of Social Choice and Welfare (Montreal, June, 2008).

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Jennifer McGrath

Department of Psychology

Jennifer J. McGrath, PhD, M.P.H., received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Bowling Green State University and her M.P.H. in Epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh. She completed her postdoctoral fellowship at the Cardiovascular Behavioural Medicine Training Program of the University of Pittsburgh. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor at Concordia University, Montreal. Her research broadly focuses on the pathogenesis of subclinical cardiovascular disease markers across childhood and adolescence as mediated by potential behavioural, environmental, and psychological mechanisms that influence these markers, and possibly confer susceptibility to developing cardiovascular disease. Dr. McGrath is particularly interested in health disparities and how socioeconomic inequalities are associated with cardiovascular health behaviours in youth. Dr. McGrath is the principal investigator of 6 grants with funding totalling over $1.8 million from CIHR, FQRSC, and CTCRI, among others. Additionally, she is a co-investigator on 5 additional grants with funding totalling over $3 million. Dr. McGrath has over 10 publications since her arrival at Concordia, with two notable publications featured in the Canadian Medical Association Journal and the International Journal of Obesity (cited by Time magazine). Dr. McGrath teaches statistics and research methods at the undergraduate level. Students consistently rate her in the top 30% for her enthusiasm about teaching, effectively communicating course material, encouraging participation, and providing effective feedback. She is rated in the top 10% for her overall rating as a professor. Dr. McGrath supervises four graduate students who hold external funding and have received multiple awards for their research presentations. Finally, Dr. McGrath is an active departmental citizen, serving as the Chair of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. She also serves as a reviewer for CIHR and multiple scientific journals.

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Elizabeth L. Miller

Department of Communication Studies

Elizabeth Miller received her MFA in Electronic Arts from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Before joining the Department of Communication Studies at Concordia in 2004, Miller held a three-year position as the Five College Assistant Professor of Film and Video Production in Massachusetts (Amherst, Smith, University of Massachusetts) and a one-year position in video and media studies at Hampshire College. Miller has been particularly active in her department's video stream and has developed several new courses including Film/Video 1, Beyond the Reflection of Reality: Latin American Cinema, Democracy and the Documentary and You are What You Eat: The Politics of Food and Film. Miller's teaching contributions extend beyond the classroom. Two years ago, Miller helped launch the two-week Witness Video Advocacy Institute (VAI) at Concordia. The VAI provides training in video and online technologies to international human rights activists around the world. In the last two years the VAI has involved 18 Concordia production students, trained 60 human rights activists, and fostered collaborations with Benny Farm and the National Film Board. Last year, Miller completed "The Water Front," an hour-long documentary on water privatization. The film has won 5 awards, traveled to festivals around the world, and is currently on tour around the Great Lakes. In 2006, Miller received a SSHRC Research-Creation Grant for "Mapping Memories: Imaging a Future," which explores the potential of new media tools such as "do it yourself" cartography with refugee youth. Miller is also a board member and a project coordinator (Refugee Youth) of the interdisciplinary Community-University Research Alliance (CURA) grant, "Life Stories of Montrealers Displaced by War, Genocide and Other Human Rights Violations," a project led by oral historian Steve High. Miller has brought her experience as a documentary filmmaker to the development of another inter-faculty research group, The Concordia Centre for Documentary. This four-person team includes senior scholars Dr. Marty Allor and Dr. Thomas Waugh, and professor and filmmaker Daniel Cross. The group received SSHRC funding in 2004 and hosted the 12th edition of the major international documentary conference, "Visible Evidence." Miller is the faculty supervisor of the student group Cinema Politica and a board member of the International Association of Women in Radio and Television.

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Muhammad Ayaz Naseem

Department of Education

Muhammad Ayaz Naseem was hired as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Education (Educational Studies Program) at Concordia in 2004. Prior to joining Concordia, Dr. Naseem served as a Lecturer in International Relations and as an Assistant Professor of Defense and Strategic Studies at the Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan. Dr. Naseem holds a PhD in Comparative and International Education from McGill University. His research interests include feminist theory and philosophy, peace education, education in diverse societies, post-structuralism, qualitative methodologies and democratic and citizenship education. He has published widely including 4 books and more than 20 articles and book chapters. His co-authored book Scientism and Education was recently awarded the prestigious American Educational Studies Association Critics Choice Award 2008. Dr. Naseem has received funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), the Fonds québécois de la recherche sur la société et la culture (FQRSC) and Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Germany. He has served as an external reviewer for SSHRC, Teachers College Record, and the Alberta Journal of Educational Research.

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Rosemary Reilly

Department of Applied Human Sciences

Rosemary Reilly has been associated with Concordia since 1991 and was hired in a tenure-track position in 2003. She received her doctorate from McGill University in Educational Psychology with a major concentration in Instructional Psychology and a double minor concentration in Gender in Education and Family Life Education. She is currently Acting Graduate Program Director of the MA in Human Systems Intervention program and a member of the University Human Research Ethics Committee. Her particular research interests are exploring the use of learning as a lever for change at an individual, organizational, or community level, the effects of group collaboration on creativity and expertise, and the impact of trauma on learning. Dr. Reilly has presented extensively at national and international conferences and has published 15 peer-reviewed manuscripts since commencing her tenure-track position. These publications are in the areas of creativity, the development of learning communities, qualitative changes in thinking and practice as a result of group collaboration, the impact of childhood abuse on women's vocational trajectories, and methodological challenges in researching trauma. She is currently the primary investigator on three research grants: one from Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council on community resilience and creating a liveable balance after a traumatic event; one from Fonds Québécois de la recherche sur la société et la culture on the influence of context and domain on the development of social creativity and expert thinking; and one from the Office of the Vice-President Research and Graduate Studies Catalyst Seed Funding Program examining the impact of childhood abuse, bullying, and domestic violence on adult men's learning processes.

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Jonathan Sachs

Department of English

Jonathan Sachs was hired as an Assistant Professor in the Department of English in 2004. Prior to joining the Concordia, Dr. Sachs served as a Collegiate Assistant Professor and Junior Member of the Society of Fellows at the University of Chicago. Dr. Sachs earned his PhD (2000) in English literature from the University of Chicago. He has published widely and his first monograph, titled Romantic Antiquity: Rome in the British Imagination, 1789-1832, is forthcoming from Oxford University Press. He is currently engaged in FQRSC-funded research on the politics of Romantic Period theatre.

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Uri Shalev

Department of Psychology

Uri Shalev received his PhD in Psychology from Tel Aviv University. After completing his postdoctoral training with Dr. Yavin Shaham at the National Institute on Drug Abuse/NIH in 2002, he headed the behavioural laboratory in D-Pharm Ltd., Rehovot, Israel. At the same time, he was appointed a Senior Lecturer at the Academic College Tel Aviv-Yaffo. In 2004 he joined the Department of Psychology and the FRSQ-funded Center for Studies in Behavioral Neurobiology at Concordia. Dr. Shalev has published extensively, with a focus on the brain mechanisms that underlie relapse to drug seeking, and more specifically, the overlap between these mechanisms and the ones involved in the control of feeding. He has an NSERC Discovery Grant for the period 2005-2010. Dr. Shalev holds a Canada Research Chair in Neurobiology of Drug Abuse (Tier II) from 2004-2009.

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Manish Sharma

Department of English

Manish Sharma was hired as an Assistant Professor in the Department of English in 2004. Dr. Sharma earned his PhD (2001) in Medieval English literature from the University of Cambridge. His research focuses mainly on Old English literature and its transformation of the early medieval Christian-Latin inheritance. His SSHRC funded project, "The Post-Theory Landscape in Old English Studies," seeks to deploy poststructuralist thought to theorize the approaches to Anglo-Saxon texts that underwrite the dominant research projects in the field: namely, source-criticism, lexicography, and the study of the formulaic composition of Anglo-Saxon literature. Recently accepted for publication in Literature Compass is "Beowulf and Poststructuralist Theory," which examines the possibilities for productive alliances between traditional and alternative critical methodologies in the study of the Old English epic. Forthcoming in Canadian Notes and Queries is an essay on the poststructuralist concepts that will continue to galvanize literary criticism. In preparation is an essay on the Old English Wanderer that considers how the poem harnesses the energies of the Anglo-Saxon conversion in order to further the aims of the 10th century Benedictine Reform. He is also contributing co-editor of a collection of essays on Old English Old Testament Literature that is forthcoming from the University of Toronto Press in 2010. He has published essays on Old and Middle English literature in Studies in Philology, Journal of English and Germanic Philology, English Studies, and Papers on Language and Literature.

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Marlene Sokolon

Department of Political Science

Marlene Sokolon's main area of research is ancient Greek political thought, but she also has wider interests in the history of political ideas, Roman, medieval, and modern political thought, politics and literature, and politics and emotions; in the field of public policy, Dr. Sokolon researches the political and ethical challenges of new technologies, such as agriculture and medical biotechnology, on policy formation and implementation. Her current research program focuses on the contribution of ancient poetic and dramatic texts to the understanding key political concepts, such as justice and authority, as well as how literary texts enhance political analysis. She currently is working on a book concerning the conceptualization of justice in several of Euripides' plays and how this ancient Greek understanding can help clarify modern debates on the meaning of justice. She is the author of several publications including the book Political Emotions: Aristotle and the Symphony of Reason and Emotion (Northern Illinois University Press, 2006). In the future, she intends to bring together her expertise in ancient political thought with interests in public policy; in particular, she intends to explore how ancient conceptualizations of the human relationship to the natural world shed light on contemporary debates concerning the public policy of biotechnologies.

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Craig Townsend

Department of Geography, Planning and Environment

Craig Townsend was hired as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography, Planning and Environment in 2004. He holds a Bachelor of Arts (1991) from the University of British Columbia, a Master of Environmental Design in Planning (1995) from the University of Calgary, and a Doctor of Philosophy (2004) from Murdoch University in Western Australia. Dr. Townsend's research and teaching interests are in urban passenger transportation with a geographical focus on Canada and Asia. His research analyzes the planning and performance of urban passenger transport systems in order to change them in ways which create a more sustainable and prosperous world. He currently holds a FQRSC Nouveau chercheur grant to research the impacts of rail mass transit on the built form of Bangkok. In the late 1990s he worked for three years on development assistance projects in Thailand's central planning agency, and immediately prior to joining Concordia he worked as a Research Associate at Western Australia's Planning and Transport Research Centre, where he participated in the evaluation of a proposed commuter railway for Perth.

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Tenure

Sean Gurd

Department of Classics, Modern Languages, and Linguistics

Sean Gurd was hired as Assistant Professor in the department of Classics, Modern Languages, and Linguistics in 2005 and received early promotion to Associate Professor in the spring of 2008. He received his PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Toronto in 2001 and worked as a Mellon postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern University, a Sesqui postdoctoral fellow at the University of Sydney, and a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Cincinnati before coming to Concordia. His research, which is concerned with the nature and cultures of textual change in the classical tradition, has been funded by an FQRSC grant for new professors and by a SSHRC aid to scholarly research grant. He has published a book on the history of the textual criticism of Euripides' last play, "Iphigenia at Aulis," and several articles on ancient textual culture and the history of classical philology. His current work includes two monographs on authorial revision in the ancient world, and two collective volumes on the history of classical philology.

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Satoshi Ikeda

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Satoshi Ikeda, who holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Michigan and a PhD in Sociology from SUNY, Binghamton, is an Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Concordia. His areas of research interest includes globalization, sustainability, world-system studies, food and agriculture, and Japan and East Asia. He joined his department in 2007 as a Canada Research Chair (Tier II, 2007-2011) after working in the Department of Sociology, the University of Alberta, between 1998 and 2007 (tenured since 2003). He published 1 book, 8 journal articles, and 13 book chapters. He was a member of a SSHRC MICRI project on globalization (2000-2005) entitled "Neoliberal Globalism and its Challengers." He also received a standard SSHRC grant (2005-2007) entitled "Gainers and Losers of Globalization: An Examination of the Trajectories of 150 Countries and the Zonal Structure of the World Economy." He held a Japan Foundation Fellowship (2004-2005) and stayed in Kyoto University for one year as a visiting fellow. He served as the Chair of East Asian Council of the Canadian Asian Studies Association (2004-2008) and as an executive member of the Japan Studies Association of Canada (2004-2007), organizing conferences for these Associations. His Canada Research Chair project, entitled "Political Sociology of Global Futures," investigates the emerging social economies as sustainable, just, egalitarian, and democratic alternatives to the predominant corporate economy that is increasingly dysfunctional. He plans to develop his CRC research room into a Global Futures Laboratory to create a social and academic movement to study social economies.

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Promotion to Professor

Paul Bandia

Département d'Études Françaises

Paul Bandia received his PhD (1993) in Linguistics from the Université de Montréal. From 1993 to 1995, he was an Assistant Professor in the Département d'études françaises at Concordia as a Limited Term Appointment. In 1995 he was appointed Maître de Conférences by the Ministère de l'Enseignement Supérieur (Ministry of Higher Education) in France and posted to the Université des Antilles et de la Guyane, Martinique (F.W.I.). In 1997, Dr. Bandia returned to the Études Françaises department at Concordia in a tenure-track position and received early promotion to the rank of Associate Professor in June 1999. His teaching and research interests include translation history and theory, postcolonialism, cultural studies, discourse analysis, Francophone and Anglophone literature. A truly multidisciplinary scholar, Dr. Bandia brings together concepts and knowledge that hold sway in a variety of fields in order to explore issues related to literary and cultural translation. He is considered a leading scholar in postcolonial translation studies and is generally credited with expanding translation research to include discourses of representation, interculturality and transnationalism with respect to non-Western cultures (i.e. Africa and the diaspora). He is the author of numerous publications including many books and dozens of book chapters, articles and reviews in international journals. Dr. Bandia's research projects have been funded by the FQRSC (FCAR) (1999-2003) and SSHRC (1999-2003; 2008-2011). He is currently engaged in SSHRC funded research on translation, migration and globalization. Dr. Bandia has been on the executive of the Canadian Association for Translation Studies, and is an active member of the Translation Studies community.

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Graham Carr

Department of History

Graham Carr received his PhD in History from the University of Maine at Orono in 1983. He was first hired at Concordia as a Limited Term Appointment in 1983 and was later hired into a tenure track position in the Department of History in 1988. A multidisciplinary scholar who works on 20th century North American cultural history, Dr. Carr's publications cover a wide range of topics from literary history to cultural diplomacy, cultural policy, media studies and public history. His work has appeared in journals in Canada and internationally, and two of his articles have won major prizes. Dr. Carr teaches both Canadian and US history at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and has been very active in graduate student supervision. In addition to research and teaching, Dr. Carr has a long record of service to the University, including most recently as chair of the Department of History and Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Externally, Dr. Carr sits on the Board of the Canadian Federation of the Humanities and Social Sciences and is a member of the Advisory Panel on Communications, Marketing and Programming for the National Capital Commission.

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Chantal David

Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Chantal David was hired as an Assistant Professor in Concordia in 1993. She had just completed a PhD in Mathematics (1993) and a Master in Electrical Engineering (1989) from McGill University. She was promoted to Associate Professor in 1999. Her research interests are analytic number theory, elliptic curves and L-functions, and she has published extensively in those areas. Her research has been continuously funded by NSERC Individual Discovery Grants, and she also received a NSERC LSI grant (2003-2006), two FQRNT Team grants (2002-2005 and 1999-2002) with colleagues from Concordia, McGill and Université de Montreal, and a FCAR New Researchers Research Grant (1995-1998). She was invited to give many national and international conferences about her work, including the prestigious Spitalfields Days on the London Mathematical Society in 2004. She was an invited professor at the University of Rome III in 2002 and at the Institut Elie-Cartan in Nancy in 2008. She has served on numerous grant evaluation committees. Since 2004, she is Deputy Director of the Centre de Recherches Mathematiques (CRM).

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Michel Dugas

Department of Psychology

Michel Dugas obtained his PhD in Psychology from l'Université Laval in 1997. He was hired as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology in 1998. He is currently an Associate Professor and also holds a one-day-a-week cross appointment as a Clinical Scientist at the Anxiety Disorders Clinic of l'Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal. Over the past 15 years, Dr. Dugas has conducted research on the etiology and treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), a condition characterized by chronic, excessive, and uncontrollable worry and anxiety. His research programme has led to the development and validation of a psychological treatment for GAD, which is now being used in health care settings in numerous countries, including the United States, Argentina, France, England, Italy, Spain, Australia, and New Zealand. Since coming to Concordia, his work has been consistently funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, including numerous operating grants and a New Investigator Award. Although Dr. Dugas completed his PhD training only 11 years ago, he has already published 66 peer reviewed articles and made over 200 scientific conference presentations.

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Ollivier Dyens

Département d'Études Françaises

Ollivier Dyens a enseigné à l'Université Sainte-Anne en Nouvelle-Ecosse et à la Louisiana State University à Baton Rouge avant de se joindre au corps professoral de l'Université Concordia en 2000. Il est occupe actuellement le poste de Vice-recteur adjoint aux études. De 2005 à 2008, il a occupé les fonctions de directeur du département d'Études françaises. Ollivier Dyens a créé trois sites Web d'importances Chair et Métal, 1998-2003 (archivé à la fondation Daniel Langlois) et Continent X, sites qui examinent la cyberculture ainsi que La Condition inhumaine qui propose une carte de la posthumanité. Ollivier Dyens est aussi l'auteur de dix livres dont La Condition inhumaine aux éditions Flammarion, Les Murs des planètes suivi de La Cathédrale aveugle (textes et cédérom), recueil de poésie multimédia publié chez VLB éditeur, finaliste pour le prix de poésie Terrasses Saint-Sulpice de la revue Estuaire, et Chair et Métal: évolution de L'homme, la technologie prend le relais, VLB Editeur, qui s'est mérité le prix du meilleur essai de la Société des écrivains canadiens (section Montréal) et qui a été publié en anglais chez MIT Press. Conférencier invité au Parson School of Design, au New Museum of Contemporary Art, au Maryland Institute College of Art, au Centre Européen de Technoculture, à Ars électronia, et au Digital Humanities Summer Institute, il est aussi artiste multimédia, ses œuvres numériques ayant été exposées au Canada, en Allemagne, en Argentine, en Arménie, aux états-Unis, au Venezuela et au Brésil.

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Norman Ingram

Department of History

Norman Ingram was a Commonwealth Scholar in Modern European History at the University of Edinburgh, where he took his PhD in 1988 under the supervision of the late Professor Maurice Larkin. From 1988 until his appointment to Concordia in 1992, he held a Killam postdoctoral fellowship, and then a Canada Research Fellowship at the University of Alberta. He received early tenure at Concordia in 1995, and has been an Associate Professor since then. His first book, The Politics of Dissent: Pacifism in France, 1919-1939 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991) was widely and positively reviewed on both sides of the Atlantic in newspapers and journals ranging from Die Zeit and the Times Literary Supplement to the English Historical Review and the Historische Zeitschrift. He has since published a large number of book chapters and scholarly articles in the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Germany, the United States and Canada. Dr. Ingram has held two SSHRC and one FQRSC individual research grants. He has supervised 3 PhD students to completion (1 at Concordia and 2 at McGill), and is currently supervising 2 more at Concordia, with another to begin in September. Since 1999, he has supervised 13 honours students and 9 MA theses. In 2001, his commitment to his undergraduate students was recognised with a Concordia Council for Student Life Merit Award. Dr. Ingram is currently finishing a book manuscript, entitled "Eyes Across the Rhine: the Ligue des droits de l'homme and the German Problem, 1914-1944," which is the fruit of his latest SSHRC Standard Research Grant project.

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Adrian Iovita

Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Adrian Iovita was hired as an Associate Professor in the Mathematics and Statistics Department at Concordia in 2003. Prior to joining the Univresity, Dr. lovita served as Assistant Professor at the University of Washington, Seattle (1998-2003) and as a postdoctoral fellow at CICMA Montreal (1996-1998). Dr. lovita earned his PhD in Mathematics (more precisely in Arithmetic Geometry in 1996) from Boston University. Since then he published a large (relative to his field of research) number of influential research articles which brought him a Canada Research Chair, Tier II (2003-2008, renewed 2008-2013) and the Ribemboim Prize for excellence of research in number theory in 2008. He is an active member of the Montreal group of researchers working in number theory (CICMA) and has fruitful collaborations with universities in Paris, France and Padua, Italy. He is an active supervisor of MS and PhD students.

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Paul Joyce

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Paul Joyce received a PhD in Biochemistry from Dalhousie University in 1989. He then spent two years (1989-1991) as Research Associate in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Louisville before being hired here as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. In 1996 he was promoted to Associate Professor. Dr. Joyce's research focuses on the enzymes involved in RNA maturation and on protein targeting, i.e., how proteins are directed from where they are made to where they carry out their functions. He publishes regularly in these areas and he and his students have made presentations at more than 60 conferences. Over the years his research has been funded continuously by NSERC and he has also received support from Genome Canada, CFI and FCAR. Since coming to Concordia, 19 graduate students and more than 100 undergraduate students have carried out research projects in his laboratory. He has taught courses ranging from those for introductory undergraduate students to those covering more specialized topics at the graduate level. He was awarded the Dean's Award for Teaching Excellence (2007-2008) from the Faculty of Arts and Science.

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Dennis Murphy

Department of Communication Studies

Dennis Murphy's areas of teaching and research include propaganda analysis, communication ethics and public relations. He has widely presented on these topics in several international forums over the past two decades. He has also served internationally as communications analyst and consultant in Germany, France and Hungary since 1996 on projects related to media education training. He is currently working with the Regimental Advisory Council of the Royal Montreal Regiment as the RMR's communications consultant and worked for several years before that with the Canadian Armed Forces in training courses on psychological operations. Dr. Murphy served as Executive Director of University Communications for Concordia from 2001-2005.

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Charles Reiss

Department of Classics, Modern Languages and Linguistics

Charles Reiss received a BA in Mathematics from Swarthmore College in 1985 and a PhD in Linguistics from Harvard University in 1995. He is co-author of The Phonological Enterprise (with Mark Hale, Concordia) and I-Language: An Introduction to Linguistics as Cognitive Science (with Daniela Isac, Concordia), both from Oxford University Press in 2008, and co-editor (with Gillian Ramchand, Tromsø) of the Oxford Handbook of Linguistic Interfaces, in 2006. His interests are phonological theory and cognitive science.

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Kimberly Anne Sawchuk

Department of Communication Studies

Kimberly Sawchuk acquired her Bachelor's degree with joint honors in 1982 from the University of Winnipeg, where she majored in both Political Science (for which she won the Gold Medal) and History. She completed her MA in 1986 and acquired a PhD in 1991 from York University's innovative interdisciplinary program, Social and Political Thought. She joined Communication Studies in 1990. Dr. Sawchuk has been the recipient of an award for teaching (1996) and is an extremely active supervisor—she has graduated over 40 students as primary supervisor. Her research interests traverse the arts, humanities and the social sciences. She has been awarded grants and published on the history of cultural studies and the figure of C. Wright Mills; embodiment and communications with a particular expertise in the visual culture of biomedicine; and feminism and the digital media arts. Her most recent inquiries in this latter area focus on the emergent field of mobile media technologies. She has completed three anthologies with national and international presses and is the co-founder of the online journal "wi: a journal of mobile media." In 2005 she became the editor of the Canadian Journal of Communication. Dr. Sawchuk has played a key role in shaping the graduate programs in communications and media studies as past director of the MA in Media Studies and the joint Doctoral Program in Communication where she served as both local and general director. In 1996 Dr. Sawchuk co-founded the Montreal digital media arts organization studioXX, the first digital arts studio by and for women in the country.

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